Monaco

Population size: 

38,964 (2019) [1]

Number of people experiencing domestic abuse each year:

33 cases of violence against women in 2019 recorded by the police.

1 in 2 cases are committed at the home of the victim or perpetrator.[2]

Statistics show that less than 40% of women who are experiencing violence actually seek help. Those who do tend to turn to friends and family members, and very few seek the help of police.[3]

The average age of female victims of violence committed in Monaco was 37 years, while the average age of perpetrators was 42. Nearly 60% of cases involved physical abuse, and 25% involved sexual abuse. The other incidents involved psychological abuse or harassment. 1 in 2 incidents occurred in the home of the victim or perpetrator. 58% of violent acts were committed by the victim’s spouse or former spouse. 74% of violent incidents committed in Monaco in 2019 resulted in a complaint being filed.[4]

No research on male victims or other gender identities.

Cost of domestic abuse to the economy each year:

No research.


Estimated % change due to COVID-19:

According to Céline Cottalorda, Monaco’s authorities are yet to report any significant rise in cases. “Since the start of confinement, social services have not been aware of any specific situations of domestic violence, nor has the Association for the Assistance of Victims of Criminal Offenses (AVIP),” said Ms Cottalorda. “Police have also not seen an increase in the number of cases.” But it is unlikely that Monaco is immune to the phenomenon.[5]


Three situations of minor violence have been recorded during lockdown. Of these three cases, no complaints were filed. “The social service, the police and the charities working in Monaco have noted a drop in calls.”[6]


Current law and policy:


Women’s rights are a key issue for Monaco. Over the last few years, the Principality has acceded to international conventions under the auspices of the UN and the Council of Europe on combatting violence and discrimination against women and on promoting gender equality. This commitment also seeks to change and include society as a whole.

The Government of Monaco created the Women’s Rights Committee in order to place women issues at the core of its priorities and enables the Government to expand/coordinate its efforts, working closely with other institutions & civil society. In creating a Women’s Rights Committee, the Prince’s Government took the decision to go further, placing women’s issues at the core of its priorities.

The Committee includes representatives from the Ministries, relevant government departments and the Department of Justice, as well as the Chief Officer for Women’s Rights. The Chief Officer, appointed pursuant to Ministerial Order No. 2018-1006 of 25 October 2018, is responsible for monitoring the implementation of the Committee’s decisions and guidelines. She carries out her duties cross-functionally, liaising directly with the competent entities.

The Committee promotes and safeguards Women’s rights or the Women’s Rights Committee was established by Sovereign Ordinance on 25th October 2018. It is a response to the recommendations issued by international women’s rights organisations, and has the remit to promote gender equality and combat violence and discrimination against women. The Committee enables the Government to expand its efforts in a coordinated way, working closely with other institutions and with civil society.[7]


The role of the Committee is to coordinate, implement, monitor and assess the national policies and measures adopted in order to promote gender equality and to prevent and combat all forms of violence and discrimination against women, in accordance with the CETS No.197, Istanbul Convention and CEDAW.

These forms of violence and discrimination include those covered by the following conventions:

• Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence, concluded in Istanbul on 11 May 2011

• Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, adopted in New York on 18 December 1979

[8]

In relation to COVID-19, on 30 April 2020, a Joint Statement on Domestic and Sexual Violence Risks under Covid-19 in the OSCE region was delivered by Ambassador Neil Bush, on behalf of Monaco. The joint statement affirms Monaco’s commitment to address the issue of Domestic Violence under Covid-19 , to mitigate the risks of domestic violence, and ensure the victims have access to the support services they need.[9]: there is a greater risk of domestic and sexual violence during the COVID-19 crisis. Domestic violence often increases during times of heightened stress. This is particularly the case when it is linked to economic instability and fears of job losses. The last weeks are no exception. Women and girls are the overwhelming majority of victims of gender-based violence; however, it is also important to recognise that anyone can be affected, regardless of gender.”


Public spending - With regards to NGO and civil society organisations, the main examples are AVIP and GenderHopes, they currently receive no public funding.[10]


CélineCottalorda, adomesticviolenceisor to Minister of State and the Ministerial representative for the protection of women’s rights assessed that it is still too high a figure in light of the severity of the situation, but very encouraging for a population of 38,000.“We’re talking about small ratios,” she explains. “Obviously we must take into account the violence that goes unreported and the situations that escape the attention of the authorities, but proportions remain low.”[11]


Frontline Services:

 

Sources


[1] The World Bank, (1).

[2] Comité Droits des Femmes (Principauté de Monaco) & IMSEE Monaco Statistics, ”Violences faites aux femmes à Monaco en 2019”

(January 2020)

[3] C. Tanti, “Monaco readies for increase in domestic violence” (monacolife.net, 31 March 2020)

[4] Comité Droits des Femmes (Principauté de Monaco), “Information published on violence against women in Monaco during 2019”, (14 January 2020)

[5] C. Tanti, “Monaco readies for increase in domestic violence”, (31 March 2021)

[6] “Domestic violence and lockdown: where do we stand?”, (Monaco Tribune, 30 April 2020)

[7] Comité Droits des Femmes (Principauté de Monaco), “The committee”

[8] UN Human Rights Council 40th Session, “Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review* Monaco Addendum (A/HRC/40/13/Add.1)”, (Universal Periodic Review, 25 February-22 March 2019),<https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G19/040/29/PDF/G1904029.pdf> (see page 2-3) & UN Human Rights Council 40th Session, “Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review* Monaco (A/HRC/40/13)”, (Universal Periodic Review, 25 February-22 March 2019), <https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G18/446/39/PDF/G1844639.pdf?OpenElement> (see page 10-11)

[9] “Joint statement on domestic and sexual violence risks under Covid-19 in the OSCE region” (30 April 2020)

[10] Group of Experts on Action against Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (GREVIO), GREVIOBaseline Evaluation Report: Monaco”, (27 September 2017)

[11] “Domestic violence and lockdown: where do we stand?”, (Monaco Tribune, 30 April 2020)