Brazil

Population Size:

211,049,527.[1]

Number of People Experiencing Domestic Abuse Each Year:

2019-2020: 3.1% of women reported having experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner.[2]

80% of domestic violence victims were women. The proportion of female victims was 3.2 times greater than male victims.[3]

No further research on male victims or other gender identities.

Cost of Domestic Abuse to the Economy Each Year:

No research.

Estimated % Change due to COVID-19:

Official reporting is down but The Brazilian Forum on Public Safety analysed more than 50,000 posts on Twitter of which 6,000 indicated domestic abuse had occurred, thereby representing a 431% increase.[4] Other research has suggested a 40-50% increase in the number of incidents of domestic abuse.[5]


Current Law and Policy:

The Brazilian government has made various commitments.[6] It has committed itself to implementing laws, including the Maria da Penha Law on Domestic and Family Violence, which calls for the establishment of special courts and stricter sentences for offenders. It has also committed itself to strengthening the National Pact for Ending Violence against Women, establishing shelters for survivors of domestic abuse, combatting the trafficking of women and girls and promoting public campaigns and actions to end violence against women.

Prevention programmes and support services were estimated to cost roughly 12% of Brazil’s total health budget.[7]


Frontline Services:

 

Sources


[1] The World Bank, (1).

[2] UN Women, “Global Database on Violence Against Women – Brazil”, (evaw-global-database.unwomen.org).

[3] K. Barbosa, B. Walker, N. Schuurman, S. Cavalcanti, E. Ferreira and R. Ferreira, “Epidemiological and Spatial Characteristics of Interpersonal Physical Violence in a Brazilian City: A Comparative Study of Violent Injury Hotspots in Familial vs. Non-Familial Settings, 2012-2014”, (journals.plos.org, 7 January 2019).

[4] TeleSur, “Domestic Violence Increases 431% in Brazil Amid Lockdown”, (telesurenglish.net, 20 April 2020).

[5] E. Graham-Harrison, A. Giuffrida, H. Smith and L. Ford, “Lockdowns Around the World Bring Rise in Domestic Violence”, (theguardian.com, 28 March 2020).

[6] UN Women, (10).

[7] The World Bank, “Gender Equality and Development – Intimate Partner Violence: Economic Costs and Implications for Growth and Development”, (2013), Women’s Voice, Agency and Participation Research Series 2013 No. 3, 47.